Yoshihiro Artisan Hand Engraved Mizaru, Kikazaru, Iwazaru The Three Wise Monkeys Aonamiuchi Blue Steel#1 Usuba 210mm Japanese Vegetable Chef Knife Octagon Yew Handle

Product Code: AOUSEDMK210YH
  • $899.99
    Unit price per 
  • Save $100.01


This knife is part of a limited edition that hand-crafted with extraordinary skill by our master artisans. Aoko Blue Steel #1 with a hardness on the Rockwell scale of 64, is intricately forged with iron to create beautiful wave like patterns. It takes a very high degree of skill to create knives of exceptional performance with such exquisite beauty. Namiuchi means wave forged, and our master artisans blend aesthetics with the highest quality materials and and craftsmanship.

The Edo Usuba is reminiscent of a small cleaver and has a blunt tip that comes in handy for such things as cutting the eye out of a potato. The Usuba is hefty enough to chop through heavy root vegetables with a blade that can thinly slice delicate tomatoes. Our handmade Yoshihiro Aonamiuchi Blue Steel knives are crafted with extraordinary skill by our master artisans. Aoko Blue Steel #1 with a hardness on the Rockwell scale of 64, is intricately forged with iron to create beautiful wave like patterns. It takes a very high degree of skill to create knives of exceptional performance with such exquisite beauty. Namiuchi means wave forged, and our master artisans blend aesthetics with the highest quality materials and and craftsmanship.

Our Yoshihiro Aonamiuchi Blue Steel knives are complimented with a traditional Japanese style handcrafted Yew tree wooden handle affixed with a Water Buffalo horn bolster, and a protective wooden sheath called a Saya is included, which protects the knife and adds to its appearance when not in use. One of the most sought after of knives and fast becoming a new essential companion to the popular chefs knife is the traditional Japanese vegetable knife known as the Edo Usuba. The Three Wise Monkeys, Mizaru, Kikazaru, Iwazaru is a Japanese pictoral maxim that embody the principal, see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. Its origins in Japan can be traced back to the 8th century during the early periods of Buddhist transmission from China. The three monkeys are Mizaru, covering his eyes to see no evil; Kikazaru, covering his ears to hear no evil; and Iwazaru, covering his mouth to speak no evil. The concept of the monkeys originates from a simple play on words and does not have anything to do with the meaning of the maxim. Each word in the Japanese saying, Mizaru, Kikazaru, Iwazaru, ends with zaru, an archaic negative verb conjugation that also happens to be pronounced the same way as the word for monkey.


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